Ticket prices are $1 higher at the door.


Saturday, March 10

Le Concert  7:00 p.m.
French/Russian, 2009, 100 Minutes, Russian, French with subtitles
Andrei Filipov refuses to think of himself as a janitor at Moscow’s Bolshoi Orchestra. Demoted years ago by Soviet bureaucrats who accused him of being insubordinate, Andrei dreams of the chance to return as the orchestra’s conductor. One day, he accidentally intercepts an invitation for the Bolshoi to play in Paris, and starts reuniting his former musicians so that they can play the Tchaikovsky concerto that was outlawed by the government. For the concert, Andrei engages a young violin soloist with whom he has an unexpected connection. Le Concert is a crowd-engaging, emotionally stirring film that will leave you cheering!

CineArts | $10
Underwritten by Aaron Metals, Claudia and Rick Felson, and Betsy Fels Pottruck.
Co-sponsor: Temple Isaiah.


Rabies  9:30 p.m.
Israel, 2010, 90 minutes, Hebrew with subtitles
Never go into the woods…In this first of our two Late Night Thriller Chillers (see Sunday, March 18th, 8:00 PM for Kirot), our protagonists (including a forest ranger, his girlfriend, some local cops, and four teen-agers going to a tennis match) become trapped in a sinister world dominated by fear, secrets and a rampaging monster. This is Israel’s first entry into the horror/thriller genre, and stars a host of young actors plus Lior Ashkenazi (Late Marriage).

CineArts | $10



Sunday, March 11

David  9:30 a.m.
USA, 2011, 80 minutes, English, Arabic with subtitles
Daud, the 11 year-old son of an imam in Brooklyn, feels marginalized from society and even from other youth in the Muslim community. Through an innocent act of good faith and a case of mistaken identity, he becomes acquainted with a group of Jewish boys at a local yeshiva. Soon, a genuine friendship develops between him and one of the boys—a relationship that is challenged when Daud’s religion is revealed. PG-13. Discussion to follow.

CineArts | $7


An Article of Hope  Noon
USA, 2010, 60 minutes, English, Hebrew with subtitles
On February 1, 2003, the Space Shuttle Columbia breaks up over West Texas. Seven astronauts, including Ilan Ramon, Israel’s first man in space, are quickly gone. Also gone is a tiny Torah scroll — smuggled into a concentration camp during the Holocaust, safeguarded by a Holocaust survivor, and carried into space by Ramon. Combining historical and personal footage, this poignant documentary reaches across faiths and nationalities to tell a truly human story.

CineArts | $7
Underwritten by City National Bank, and Cristina and Jonathan Wornick.



La Vérité Si Je Mens I (Would I Lie to You, I)  1:40 p.m.
France, 1997, 100 minutes, French with subtitles
In this delightful romantic comedy, we meet Eddie Vuibert, a down-on-his-luck guy who hides out from his creditors in Paris’s Le Sentier garment district. Mistaken by his new Sephardic Jewish bosses as a co-religionist, he plays along, only to find his life transformed in ways he never imagined.

CineArts | $10
See the sequel on Tuesday, March 13 at 7:30 PM.
Underwritten by Beryl and Ivor Silver.


Gei Oni (Valley of Fortitude)  3:45 p.m.
Israel, 2009, 90 minutes, Hebrew with subtitles
Bay Area Premiere! Winner of China’s “Oscar” for Best Film, Gei Oni is both a moving love story and a sweeping historical drama set in 19th century Palestine. Having escaped a vicious pogrom in Russia, 17 year-old Fanya arrives in Jaffa with her baby son, an aging uncle and an emotionally scarred brother. Unable to support her family, she quickly marries a widower, who is looking for a mother for his two little children. Fanya joins her new husband at his small farm in the Galilee, all the time hiding a terrible secret from her past.

CineArts | $10
Underwritten by Max, Coleman and Dana Gross in memory of Joyce Gross Z”L.
Special Guest: Award-winning Director Dan Wolman will introduce his film and be honored for his contributions to Israeli culture.


Mary Lou  7:15 p.m.
Israel, 2010, 150 minutes, Hebrew with subtitles
East Bay Premiere! In Mary Lou, acclaimed director Eytan Fox (Yossi and Jagger, Walk on Water) has directed a feel good film that will make your toes tap and your heart reach out for Meir, a young gay man who is on a mission to find his mother. Abandoned by her when he was 10, Meir is obsessed with the music of Israeli legend Svika Pick (his mother’s favorite composer). Upon graduation from high school, he heads for Tel Aviv to search for her, questioning people in the music business and even Pick himself. Eventually, he realizes that his first priority must be to find his own identity and to move on with his life.

CineArts | $10
Underwritten by Susan and Howard Geifman, Susan and Moses Libitzky and Revelli Construction.

Enjoy the music of Svika Pick, one of Israel’s legendary composers and singers. Live mini-concert by the Israeli band The Vibers.





Monday, March 12

Surviving Hitler: A Love Story  11:30 a.m.
England, 2010, 66 minutes, German, English with subtitles
Although the plot of this astonishing and impressive story sounds like fiction, the events depicted actually occurred. As a teenager in Nazi Germany, Jutta is shocked to discover she is Jewish. She joins the German resistance and meets Helmuth, an injured soldier. The two become sweethearts and soon co-conspirators in the final plot to assassinate Hitler. This is a remarkable story about war, resistance, and survival…with a miraculously happy ending.

CineArts | $7


Wrong Side of the Bus  1:10 p.m.
South Africa, 2011, 56 minutes, English
Some forty years ago when Sidney Bloch was a medical student in Apartheid-ruled South Africa, he witnessed his ‘colored’ classmates being discriminated against — even prevented from being in the rooms of white patients. Bloch’s only protest against Apartheid was his decision to depart for Australia, where he became a leading psychiatrist. This riveting documentary begins as Bloch prepares to attend his medical school class reunion. Although he considers himself an ethical man, he now measures himself against the actions of those who actively protested against Apartheid.

CineArts | $7
Guest Speaker: Mervyn Decker, Executive Director, American Jewish Committee.


The Truth and Lies Game  3:15 p.m.
Israel, 2005, 52 minutes, Hebrew with subtitles
Despite their different personalities, Tommy and Ronnie become good friends while in film school. Soon, hot-headed Tommy starts dating an actress, Dana, who then drops him to marry the calmer and kinder Ronnie. Bring in Lia, an émigré from Russia working on her Doctorate. Three months after Tommy and Lia’s wedding, the two couples get together over drinks to celebrate Dana’s 29th birthday. Watch the games begin.

CineArts | $10


Tony Curtis: Driven to Stardom  5:15 p.m.
USA, 2011, 96 minutes, English
Bay Area Premiere! Spartacus, Sweet Smell of Success, Some Like It Hot. Tony Curtis, the man who influenced Elvis Presley and James Dean, was one of the very first teen idols and one of the last real “movie stars.” This revealing documentary covers his difficult upbringing in the Bronx, where he was born Bernie Schwartz, to his unprecedented rise to fame, using exclusive footage, film clips and interviews with friends such as Hugh Hefner, Harry Belafonte, Debbie Reynolds, Piper Laurie and Theresa Russell.

CineArts | $10


Who Do You Love?  7:30 p.m.
USA, 2010, 92 minutes, English
Bo Diddley, Muddy Waters and Etta James were rocketed to stardom in the 1950’s by legendary and scrappy record producer Leonard Chess. In this intimate biopic, we travel with Leonard and his brother Phil (both immigrant scrap dealers) as they first realize that the blues sound would appeal to a broad American audience, and then start a nightclub that quickly evolves into a successful record company. This drama (filled with terrific music) also explores the racial divide of the times and the powerful impact that R&B has had on the music world.

CineArts | $10
Underwritten by Eileen and Robert Ruby
Co-sponsor: Congregation B’nai Tikvah.




Tuesday, March 13

Torn  11:30 a.m.
Israel, 2011, 52 minutes, Hebrew, Polish with subtitles
Twelve years after being ordained as a priest in Poland, Romuald Waszkinel learns that he was born to Jewish parents but brought up Catholic by the couple who hid him from the Nazis. The film follows Waszkinel from his church in Poland to a religious kibbutz in Israel. Although he embraces both Judaism and Catholicism, the Israeli government refuses to recognize his Jewish identity. This insightful documentary asks the question: Can you be Catholic and call yourself a Jew at the same time? Discussion to follow.

CineArts | $7


Ahoti Ha‘Yafah (My Beautiful Sister)
1:15 p.m.
Israel, 2011, 90 minutes, Hebrew with subtitles
Bay Area Premiere! Beautifully acted and with a haunting musical score, this charming drama was nominated for eleven Ophir Awards (Israeli Oscars), including Best Picture. Although it takes place in contemporary Israel, the film is based on a surreal Moroccan-Jewish legend about a triple love story. The superstitious Rahma is miserable because her unloving husband Robert (played by the excellent Moshe Ivgy) is infatuated with the ghost of her beautiful sister Mary. To complicate matters even more, the two sisters have been estranged for years, as Rahma disapproved of Mary’s marriage to an Israeli Arab.

CineArts | $7


The Fifth Heaven  3:10 p.m.
Israel, 2011, 100 minutes, Hebrew with subtitles
Bay Area Premiere! Step into the world of 1944 British-occupied Palestine. 13 year-old Maya arrives at an orphanage on the outskirts of Tel Aviv. Dr. Markowski, the orphanage director, is stunned by her arrival. Maya’s presence is a painful reminder of his unrequited love for her mother. Fed up with the tight food rations, and over-crowding, Maya dreams of running away with a young fighter from the Stern Gang who makes her an accomplice to his crimes. In the meantime, WWII rages.

CineArts | $10


Eichmann’s End: Love, Betrayal, Death
5:20 p.m.
Germany/Israel, 2010, 90 minutes, German, Spanish, Hebrew with subtitles
Former SS Colonel Adolf Eichmann feels safe in a remote suburb of Buenos Aires, unaware that two Argentineans already suspect his true identity. Lothar Hermann, a former German citizen, and his teen-age daughter Sylvia investigate her boyfriend’s father after hearing his chilling views about the Final Solution. This gripping, edge-of-your-seat docu-drama reveals the difficulties that the Hermanns encounter while trying to convince skeptical Germans and Israelis to follow up on their hunch.

CineArts | $10
Guest Speaker: Riva Gambert, EBIJFF Director.


La Vérité Si Je Mens II (Would I Lie
to You, II)
  7:30 p.m.
France, 2010, 117 minutes, French with subtitles
Bay Area Premiere! The laughs continue in this madcap sequel which boasts an entertaining script and great comic timing. Our endearing and sometimes exasperating group of Parisian Jews are still in the garment business. Unfortunately for them, they must now compete with cheap knockoffs, multinational corporations, and internet sales. Through a bad deal with a huge retailing chain, our protagonist, Eddie Vuibert faces bankruptcy. To save his business, he must call upon his best friends, Dov, Yvan, Patrick and Serge, and a lot of chutzpah to plan a way to fend off his competition.

CineArts | $10




Wednesday, March 14

Winston Churchill: Walking with Destiny  11:30 a.m.
USA, 2010, 90 minutes, English
East Bay Premiere! 1940: Although the swastika flew over most of continental Europe, Winston Churchill, Prime Minister of England, remained undaunted. Years prior to the onset of WWII, he warned the world about the Third Reich’s racial policies towards Jews. This intriguing documentary examines Churchill’s legacy and why his leadership should be an inspiration to contemporary political leaders and diplomats.

CineArts | $7


Infiltration  1:45 p.m.
Israel, 2009, 110 minutes, Hebrew with subtitles
Director Dov Kosashvilli (Late Marriage) has created a compelling drama that humanizes Israeli recruits sweating hard (both physically and emotionally) during basic training. Set in the 1950s, we meet young immigrants as well as native-born Sabras, including the idealistic and clean-cut kibbutznik who wants to become a paratrooper, the smart-aleck romantic hero, and the platoon “clown.” Infiltration is at once a black comedy, a moving, nuanced drama, and a revealing look at the army’s place in Israeli society.

CineArts | $7


Mahler on the Couch  4:00 p.m.
Germany/Austria, 2010, 98 minutes, German with subtitles
The father and son directing team of Felix and Percy Adlon (Baghdad Café) brings us this nuanced drama about the real life sessions between Sigmund Freud and Jewish-turned-Catholic composer Gustav Mahler. The latter consults the psychiatrist after he discovers that his young wife (and muse) Alma is unfaithful to him with architect Walter Gropius. With Mahler’s symphonies as a powerfully moving backdrop, this edgy, romantic drama opens up a window into 19th century Vienna. With Short Documentary Music Man Murray (See March 18, 11:45 AM for details.). Discussion to follow.

CineArts | $10
Underwritten by Elaine Gerstler and Booker Holton.


Kaddisch Fur Einen Freund  7:30 p.m.
Germany, 2010, 93 minutes, German, Arabic, Russian with subtitles
East Bay Premiere! This tense drama builds from a story of two lonely, displaced characters to a tale of respect between unlikely friends. Alexander, an 84-year-old Russian Jew, is determined to continue living by himself in his Berlin apartment. Ali, a Palestinian teen immigrant from Lebanon, lives with his family in the same apartment complex. Desperate to gain acceptance from some neighborhood teens, Ali joins them in ransacking the old man’s home. When caught, he is forced by his mother to repair the damage. As Alexander and Ali work side by side, the relationship between the feisty pair reveals prejudices on both sides.

CineArts | $10
Co-sponsor: Contra Costa Midrasha.




Thursday, March 15

Wagner and Me  11:30 a.m.
Great Britain, 2009, 59 minutes, German and English with subtitles
Bay Area Premiere! Multi-talented British actor Stephen Fry (Sherlock Holmes 2) is a life-long fan of the music of Richard Wagner, the world’s most controversial composer. But Fry is also Jewish and lost many relatives in the Holocaust. He worries that he shouldn’t listen to Wagner’s music since it is closely associated with anti-Semitism and Adolf Hitler. Shot on location in Germany, Switzerland and Russia, the film includes unique behind-the-scenes access to the Bayreuth Festival, the annual extravaganza of Wagner’s music. Animated by Fry’s trademark wit, this richly textured documentary asks whether you can separate an artist’s politics from his/her work.

CineArts | $7


Jaffa  1:10 p.m.
Israel/French/German, 2009, 90 minutes, Hebrew, Arabic with subtitles
Reuven Wolf’s garage is a family-run business located in the heart of the mixed Arab-Jewish city of Jaffa. His workers consist of his beautiful daughter Mali, his hotheaded and lazy son Meir, and a hard-working young Arab man, Tawfik. Mali and Tawfik have successfully hidden their romance and no one knows that she is pregnant. As the two lovers secretly plan their wedding, Meir baits Tawfik, and their resulting brawl ends with a tragic conclusion. Sentenced to prison, Tawfik is released after nine years, unaware that he has a daughter. Starring Ronit Elkabetz (The Band’s Visit).

CineArts | $7


Reuniting the Rubins  3:00 p.m.
UK, 2011, 97 minutes, English
Bay Area Premiere! What is a grandmother to do when her grandchildren won’t visit during the holidays? She cajoles her just retired son to forego his round-the-world-cruise, and insists he invite his four children to the family home for Passover. Enter the members of the Rubin dysfunctional family: a high-powered businessman, an outspoken eco-warrior, an ethereal Buddhist monk, and an Orthodox rabbi living in Jerusalem. This Seder-like-no-other stars Honor Blackman (Goldfinger), Timothy Spall (Harry Potter), James Callis (Battlestar Galactica) and Rhona Mitra (Rise of the Lycans).

CineArts | $10


My Australia  5:10 p.m.
Israel/Poland, 2011, 96 minutes, Polish and Hebrew with subtitles
East Bay Premiere! The recipient of the Audience Choice Award at the 2011 Jerusalem Film Festival, this gritty drama opens in 1960’s Poland. Sixteen years after the end of WWII, a mother still hides her Jewish identity from her neighbors…and from her own children. When her two sons (who have been raised Catholic) join a neo-Nazi street gang in their town, she decides to immigrate to Israel but tells her children that their destination is Australia. Soon after arriving in Haifa, she packs her kids off to a kibbutz where they begin to question their own sense of identity.

CineArts | $10


The Rabbi’s Cat (Le Chat du Rabbin)
7:30 p.m.
France, 2011, 100 minutes, French, Arabic, Russian with subtitles
Bay Area Premiere! The star of a popular French, new wave comic book is … a cat, and a kosher one at that! And now he is the star of The Rabbi’s Cat, a charming animated film. Joann Sfar, the celebrated French graphic artist turned film director, uses beautiful animation to draw us into the world of Algiers in the 1920’s. Here, we meet a rabbi, his nubile daughter, an Arab sheikh, an eccentric Russian millionaire and the daughter’s talking cat who has a philosophical bent and wants to be Jewish so he can have a Bar Mitzvah. The rabbi, the sheikh, the Russian and…the cat!...journey to the heart of Africa as they debate religion and life’s meaning. This award-winning film (which played at the UK Jewish Film Festival) is based on true stories from Sfar’s own Algerian family; it is witty entertainment for both older teens and adults of any age.



To see the subtitles, click on the 'CC' button.

CineArts | $10
Underwritten by Carole and Donald Chaiken, and Kim and Stuart Weinstein.
Co-sponsor: Diablo Valley Hadassah.





Friday, March 16

77 Steps  11:00 a.m.
Israel, 2010, 56 minutes, Hebrew, Arab and English with subtitles
In this moving documentary, Israeli filmmaker Ibtisam Mara’ana takes us on a very personal journey as she moves from her Muslim village to Tel-Aviv. While trying to rent an apartment, she encounters discrimination because of her ethnicity and religion. Eventually, she gets an apartment and begins a romantic relationship with her new neighbor — Jonathan, a Jewish-Canadian who has just arrived in Israel. New to this bustling, cosmopolitan city, both Ibtisam and Jonathan search for a place they can call home.

Orinda Theatre 2 | $7


Salsa Tel Aviv  12:30 p.m.
Israel, 2011, 100 minutes, Hebrew, Spanish with subtitles
East Bay Premiere! This saucy feature film brings together two opposites: Vicky (Mexican TV star Angelica Vale playing an outgoing Mexican salsa dancer disguised as a nun who smuggles herself into Israel) and Yoni (a hunky but serious-minded Israeli-South American scientist who is about to be married). When Vicky is busted for being in the country without a visa, she turns to Yoni for help. If you like romantic comedy and sizzling Latin music, this film is for you! Screening with the short A Reuben by Any Other Name.

Orinda Theatre 2 | $7


Les Hommes Libres (Free Men)  2:40 p.m.
France, 2011, 105 minutes, French, Arabic and subtitles
East Bay Premiere! Director Ismael Ferroukhi reveals the little known WWII story of a handful of Muslim fighters who organized their resistance activities from the Mosque of Paris. Their operations included rescuing Jews fleeing the Nazi round-ups and assassinating Vichy informants. Inspired by true stories, this thriller stars Tahar Rahim (A Prophet) and Michael Londsdale (Of Gods and Men).

Orinda Theatre 2 | $7




Saturday, March 17

Wunderkinder  7:00 p.m.
Germany, 2011, 96 minutes, German with subtitles
Bay Area Premiere! This powerful, award-winning drama celebrated its world premiere at the Jerusalem Film Festival and is set in the Ukraine in 1941. Although the invasion of the USSR by the Nazis made enemies of Germans and Russian adults, Hanna Reich, Abrascha Kaplan and Larissa Brodsky, three exceptionally talented teen-age musicians, maintain a deep and genuine friendship. United because of their love of classical music, Hanna, a Christian German, does not care that her two friends are Jewish, and all three are baffled when their world is turned upside down.

Orinda Theatre 1 | $10
Underwritten by Pearl and David Furman in memory of Ruth Mruvka.



Restoration  9:30 p.m.
Israel, 2010, 105 minutes, Hebrew with subtitles
East Bay Premiere! Winner of numerous international awards for its finely crafted performances, Restoration reveals the many layers of father-son relations. Jacob Fiedelman, (brilliantly played by Sasson Gabai of The Band’s Visit) is scarred by the harsh realities of life. His antique restoration business in Tel Aviv is facing bankruptcy, his long-time business partner has just died, and he is estranged from his son who is pushing him to sell the store. Grasping at a brighter future, Fiedelman hires a mysterious young man as his apprentice—a man who might just help him restore his own life.

Orinda Theatre 1 | $10
Underwritten by Susan and Howard Geifman.
Co-Sponsor: Consulate General of Israel.





Sunday, March 18

David  9:30 a.m.
USA, 2011, 80 minutes, English, Arabic with subtitles
Daud, the 11 year-old son of an imam in Brooklyn, feels marginalized from society and even from other youth in the Muslim community. Through an innocent act of good faith and a case of mistaken identity, he becomes acquainted with a group of Jewish boys at a local yeshiva. Soon, a genuine friendship develops between him and one of the boys—a relationship that is challenged when Daud’s religion is revealed. PG-13. Discussion to follow.

Orinda Theatre 2 | $7
Co-sponsor: Contra Costa Jewish Day School.


Ahead of Time  11:10 a.m.
USA, 2010, 90 minutes, English
Now celebrating her 100th birthday, Ruth Gruber can look back at an extraordinary life. After becoming the youngest PhD in the world, she went on to become a foreign correspondent and covered the Nuremberg trials, and documented the Haganah ship Exodus in 1947. Her relationships with such leaders as Eleanor Roosevelt, President Truman, and David Ben Gurion gave her unique insight into modern history. Directed by Bob Richman (an award-winning cinematographer—The September Issue, An Inconvenient Truth), this is a documentary that will both inspire and astound.

Orinda Theatre 1 | $7
Co-sponsor: JCRC/East Bay.


Music Man Murray  11:45 p.m.
USA, 2011, 20 minutes, English
East Bay Premiere! This delightful short documentary reveals how 90+ year-old Murray Gershenz collected over 400,000 albums, making his Hollywood store one of the largest music libraries in the world.

Orinda Theatre 2 | $5
Guest Speaker: Director Robert Parks.


Vlast  12:50 p.m.
USA, 2010, 88 minutes, Russian and English with subtitles
Mikhail Borisovich Khodorkovsky, formerly the wealthiest man in Russia, was arrested at gunpoint on a snowy Siberian runway on October 25, 2003. After challenging the absolute power of Vladimir Putin, Khodorkovsky’s oil company, YUKOS, was seized, followed by a trial that caused international outrage. He remains imprisoned following a recent conviction on embezzlement and money laundering charges. The compelling and thought-provoking film features interviews with Khodorkovsky’s family, associates and the highest level of politicians and journalists which present an unvarnished picture of political upheaval in modern Russia.

Orinda Theatre 2 | $7


Intimate Grammar  1:30 p.m.
Israel, 2010, 110 minutes, Hebrew with subtitles
This vivid and often humorous coming-of-age film set in the mid 1960’s and based on the novel by Israeli author David Grossman, introduces us to 11 year-old Aaron, a thoughtful dreamer, who spends his spare time hunting for spies and practicing magic tricks. Although he harbors a secret interest in his neighbor, the mysterious and beautiful Miss Blum, he clings to his childhood just as Israel is faced with a serious clash with Egypt and Syria, and his friends are growing up all around him.

Orinda Theatre 1 | $7


Nicky's Family  3:30 p.m.
Czech Republic/Slovak Republic, 2010, 96 minutes, English
East Bay Premiere! This new drama-documentary by Slovak director Matej Minac is a followup to his international award-winning drama, All My Loved Ones, in which we learn about “Britain’s Schindler,” Sir Nicholas Winton. Months before the onset of WWII, Nicky created the Czech Kindertransport that ultimately saved 669 children. The film is a testament not only to Nicky’s work but also to today’s teens and young adults who see the 101 year-old former stock broker as a role model, and have committed themselves to doing acts of righteousness.

Orinda Theatre 2 | $10
Co-sponsor: Contra Costa Jewish Day School and East Bay Jewish Teen Foundation.


Mabul (The Flood)  4:30 p.m.
Israel/Canada/France/Germany, 2011, 101 minutes, Hebrew with subtitles
Mabul is a passionate and finely crafted film that brings us into the lives of the Roski family. Yoni Roski is almost 13 and harbors an obsessive desire to grow taller before his Bar Mitzvah. His mother (the brilliant Ronit Elkabetz) and his father are on the brink of divorce when their older son, who is autistic, is sent home from the institution where he has been living for many years. With his parents incapable of caring for Tomer, it is Yoni who must become the caregiver and find ways to withstand the flood of challenges facing his family.

Orinda Theatre 1 | $10
Co-sponsor: Congregation B’nai Shalom.


A Matter of Size  5:50 p.m.
Israel, 2009, 90 minutes, Hebrew with subtitles
Back by Popular Demand! What is an under-employed, hefty chef to do when he is tired of counting calories? While working as a dishwasher in a Japanese restaurant in Ramlah, Herzl is exposed to the art of sumo wrestling. Soon he and his three equally hefty friends stop going to their weight-loss group and begin sumo training under the direction of Sumo Master Kitano (Togo Igawa from Memoirs of a Geisha). This delightful, crowd-pleasing comedy has been a phenomenal hit at festivals.

Orinda Theatre 2 | $10
Co-sponsors: Beth Chaim Congregation and Temple Sinai.


Little Rose  7:00 p.m.
Poland, 2010, 90 minutes, Polish with subtitles
1967 was the “Summer of Love,” drugs and rock n’roll in America; but in Poland, Soviet leaders use anti-Zionist rhetoric in order to undercut the appeal of liberal groups, charging Jews and intellectuals as outsiders bent on weakening the Warsaw pact countries. Amidst the escalating political unrest in Poland, Adam Warczewski, a famous writer and professor, is accused of clandestine contacts with anti-communist Western groups. Roman Rozek, a ruthless Security Service officer, is assigned to get “dirt” on the professor. In turn, he pressures his girlfriend Kamila, a young university secretary, to use any means to spy on the professor. This powerful and intimate drama opens a window into a time and place where it was unsafe to believe in free speech and other freedoms.

Orinda Theatre 1 | $10
Underwritten by Bari Winchell.


Kirot  8:00 p.m.
Israel, 2009, 107 minutes, Hebrew, Russian, English with subtitles
Bay Area Premiere! Olga Kurylenko (the most recent James Bond film, Quantum of Solace) plays Galia, an Ukrainian woman forced into being an assassin by a crime boss who has robbed her of her passport and thus her ability to return home. As she waits in her small apartment for her next “hit,” Galia befriends Eleanor, her Israeli neighbor, who is regularly berated and beaten by her husband. Soon, the two women team up to take action against their oppressors in a fight for survival. Adult content. Violence.

Orinda Theatre 2 | $10




JEWISH CULTURAL FILM SERIES

Sunday, March 11

An Article Of Hope  3:30 p.m.
USA, 2010, 60 minutes, English, Hebrew with subtitles
On February 1, 2003, the Space Shuttle Columbia breaks up over West Texas. Seven astronauts, including Ilan Ramon, Israel’s first man in space, are quickly gone. Also gone is a tiny Torah scroll — smuggled into a concentration camp during the Holocaust and carried into space by Ramon. This poignant documentary tells a truly human story.

WITH

The Witch from Melchet Street
Israel, 2005, 60 minutes, Hebrew with subtitles
During one magical summer, 13 year-old Assaf falls in love with a neighborhood girl. But his affection is not returned. Enter his neighbor, a 300 year-old witch who has a knack for matchmaking. A modern day urban fairytale about first love and self-confidence for children of all ages!

Vine Cinema | $7


Kaddisch Fur Einen Freund (Kaddish For A Friend)  7:15 p.m.
Germany, 2010, 93 minutes, German, Arabic, Russian with subtitles
East Bay Premiere! This tense drama builds from a story of two lonely, displaced characters to a tale of respect between unlikely friends. Alexander, an 84-year-old Russian Jew, is determined to continue living by himself in his Berlin apartment. Ali, a Palestinian teen immigrant from Lebanon, lives with his family in the same apartment complex. Desperate to gain acceptance from some neighborhood teens, Ali joins them in ransacking the old man’s home. When caught, he is forced by his mother to repair the damage. As Alexander and Ali work side by side, the relationship between the feisty pair reveals prejudices on both sides.

Vine Cinema | $10


Thursday, March 15

Mabul (The Flood)  7:30 p.m.
Israel/Canada/France/Germany, 2011, 101 minutes, Hebrew with subtitles
Mabul is a passionate and finely crafted film that brings us into the lives of the Roski family. Yoni Roski is almost 13 and harbors an obsessive desire to grow taller before his Bar Mitzvah. His mother (the brilliant Ronit Elkabetz) and his father are on the brink of divorce when their older son, who is autistic, is sent home from the institution where he has been living for many years. With his parents incapable of caring for Tomer, it is Yoni who must become the caregiver and find ways to withstand the flood of challenges facing his family.

Vine Cinema | $10


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